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Nadia Addesi Hot Videos

A healthy relationship can feel boring and lonely when you’ve been used to toxicity, chaos and instability. Our nervous systems become conditioned to survive in the uncertain circumstances. When we are used to previous relationships, or even parents who bring us a lot of stress and anxiety, it becomes our lifestyle and what we feel comfortable in, regardless of what’s happening. The chaos makes us feel connected, the lack of independence makes us feel connected, the pushing and pulling makes us feel connected. We become used to, and comfortable with the highs and the lows consistently changing. We feel comfortable in the arguments and the lows because we know that the highs are coming next. It’s unpredictable and knowing the person will show up after the lows helps us feel connected, even though it’s unhealthy. When someone is giving us a lot one day, then taking it away the next, we become dependent on them. When we enter a relationship that is calm and healthy, gaining that independence back can feel lonely and scary. When we meet someone who is finally secure, we’re not used to feeling less chaos and more stability. Our nervous system doesn’t know what to do. It may look for red flags or arguments in order to get us back into the state it’s so used to and comfortable being in. It may try to pick arguments to get reassurance that we’re not alone because that’s what we’re used to. I’m not saying healthy relationships need to be boring. I’m saying they tend to be predictable, which is boring for someone who’s been thriving in chaos for years. But boring does not mean lack of fun. There are ways to keep your relationships intimate and fun that doesn’t involve those intense highs and lows. It’s about date nights, healthy communication, shared values, adventures, and love. Remember, if it feels boring it doesn’t always mean there’s a lack of chemistry, it can mean your body is finally calming down and slowly finding comfort in stability and predictably that you deserve. Ib @Thaísa | Healthy Relationships ❤️ . . . . . #stress #ptsd #complextrauma #cptsd #motivation #procrastination #wellness
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There is nothing wrong with helping the people you love, but when you lose yourself to consistently help others, it may be time to work on your boundaries and self esteem. I will be going through all the trauma responses in my next videos ❤️ the first one I want to focus on is fawn; the people pleasing response. This response can come from a variety of experiences. For childhood trauma survivors, fawn can be a trauma response that was developed as a way to stay safe forms neglectful or abusive parents. Many people who have a fawn trauma response would need to “keep the peace” and keep others happy to ensure their safety. When we people please, we often seek validation based on how useful we feel to other people, this can’t be how we measure our self worth or we will never put ourselves first. People pleasing is often an overlooked trauma response which is referred to as “fawning,” This can result in:⁣ ⁣ - feeling guilty for saying no⁣ - feeling guilty when you are angry at others⁣ - feeling responsible for other feelings⁣ - blaming yourself when things go wrong⁣ - being confused about your values and priorities⁣ - compromising your own happiness for others⁣ - low self-esteem & confidence⁣ - trying to fit in/a large desire to be included⁣ - feeling drained and exhausted⁣ ⁣ A crucial step in healing the “fawn” response will be learning to develop your true values as well as learning how to create and assert healthy boundaries. Ib @ab ❦ 🤍 . . . . . #MentalHealth #anxiety #trauma #unhealedtrauma #depression #stress #ptsd #complextrauma #cptsd #selfhelp #selflove #motivation #procrastination #wellness #therapy #therapist #mentalhealthmatters #socialanxiety #bpd #bipolar #dsm #adhd
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Have you had this thought before? When you are made to believe that you are unlikeable and undeserving of love/relationships, you can trick yourself into thinking that you manipulated everyone in your life to like you. This is common among people who struggle with low self worth and past trauma. Establishing relationships by being caring, empathetic and compassionate is not manipulation. You try to establish connection by being mindful of the thoughts and feelings of those around you. You are seen for who you are and you are loved for a reason ❤️ Ib: @magaroni_and_cheese . . . . #MentalHealth #anxiety #trauma #unhealedtrauma #depression #stress #ptsd #complextrauma #cptsd #selfhelp #selflove #motivation #procrastination #wellness #therapy #therapist #mentalhealthmatters #socialanxiety #bpd #bipolar #dsm #adhd
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Therapist here with tips🙋🏻‍♀️: My main physical symptom of anxiety is shortness of breath(explanation as to why this happens below👇🏻) When this happens, I find myself yawning as a way to connect the breath and reassure myself that I can still breathe. It always comes up at the worst times 🙃 So, why do we experience physical symptoms with out anxiety? When you experience stress or anxiety your fight or flight response is triggered because your brain is responding to a perceived threat. This response will activate your sympathetic nervous system and involuntary physical responses will take place as your body prepares to fight off or flee the threat. Some examples include: * Shortness of breath * Throat feeling tight * Pounding heart or increased heart rate. * Sweating/ having a specific sweat smell. * Trembling * Headaches * Stomach pain & digestive issues * Struggling with sleep * Muscle aches * Chest pain * Fatigue How to help: - focus on your senses- what’s around you that you can see, hear, smell? - distract yourself, if safe, pull out a game or something on your phone to get your mind off your breath - move your body! dance around, shake, walk etc Ib: @alexa vanwinkle Remember, this can mean many other things as well including asthma & POTS. Please make sure you do your own research as this is not medical advice. . . . . . #MentalHealth #anxiety #trauma #unhealedtrauma #depression #stress #ptsd #complextrauma #cptsd #motivation #procrastination #wellness #therapy #therapist #mentalhealthmatters #socialanxiety #bpd #bipolar #dsm #
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Let’s talk maladaptive daydreaming 💭 Daydreaming is completely normal, and something almost every single person does. It gives us a break from our current life, it helps us think about goals and the future and it can be exciting and pleasant. But, it does not last for extreme periods of time and we often feel content returning to our present reality. Daydreaming becomes maladaptive when it is intense, distracting and impacts a persons daily function. Maladaptive daydreaming is often an escape for an individual from their current life or pain & trauma from the past. I want to address that maladaptive daydreaming is not widely recognized and is not in the DSM. There is not a lot of evidenced based research on it. But, it can become extremely distressing for an individual and impact areas of their life such as work, school, social life & much more. Dissociating is a response that could have kept us safe when we felt as if we were in danger. We may have developed this as a way fo escape our reality and put our bodies & minds in a place that was safer than our current situation. Dissociating & daydreaming is not something you should shame yourself for. If you experience maladaptive daydreaming or you feel as if daydreaming & dissociating as a coping strategy is impacting your health, here are some tips: - Become aware of what you are experiencing & name it - Recognize the patterns & triggers that cause you to do it - Ground yourself in the present moment if possible or safe. (Using 5 senses, grounding tools, breathing etc) - Find coping strategies that are safe and work for you. This may take trial and error - Give yourself a set time to daydream and stay within that tome - Be kind to yourself- you’re doing the best you can with what you know! Give yourself time, don’t try to stop all at once and judge yourself if it doesn’t work - Set goals and small steps to achieve them Ib @jessie ˚ ༘🧁⋆。˚ ꕥ . . . . . #MentalHealth #anxiety #trauma #unhealedtrauma #depression #stress #ptsd #complextrauma #cptsd #motivation #procrastination #wellness #therapy #therapist #mentalhealthmatters #socialanxiety #bpd #bipolar #dsm
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i Let’s talk maladaptive daydreaming 💭 Daydreaming is completely normal, and something almost every single person does. It gives us a break from our current life, it helps us think about goals and the future and it can be exciting and pleasant. But, it does not last for extreme periods of time and we often feel content returning to our present reality. Daydreaming becomes maladaptive when it is intense, distracting and impacts a persons daily function. Maladaptive daydreaming is often an escape for an individual from their current life or pain & trauma from the past. I want to address that maladaptive daydreaming is not widely recognized and is not in the DSM. There is not a lot of evidenced based research on it. But, it can become extremely distressing for an individual and impact areas of their life such as work, school, social life & much more. Dissociating is a response that could have kept us safe when we felt as if we were in danger. We may have developed this as a way fo escape our reality and put our bodies & minds in a place that was safer than our current situation. Dissociating & daydreaming is not something you should shame yourself for. If you experience maladaptive daydreaming or you feel as if daydreaming & dissociating as a coping strategy is impacting your health, here are some tips: - Become aware of what you are experiencing & name it - Recognize the patterns & triggers that cause you to do it - Ground yourself in the present moment if possible or safe. (Using 5 senses, grounding tools, breathing etc) - Find coping strategies that are safe and work for you. This may take trial and error - Give yourself a set time to daydream and stay within that tome - Be kind to yourself- you’re doing the best you can with what you know! Give yourself time, don’t try to stop all at once and judge yourself if it doesn’t work - Set goals and small steps to achieve them Ib @PaisleiMae . . . . . #MentalHealth #anxiety #trauma #unhealedtrauma #depression #stress #ptsd #complextrauma #cptsd #motivation #procrastination #wellness #therapy #therapist #mentalhealthmatters #socialanxiety #bpd #bipolar #dsm
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Tips in caption ❤️ Everyone dissociates but not always to the degree of a disorder. Think of dissociation as a spectrum, where on one side we have things like zoning out, mild day dreaming, imaginary friends, imagining future scenarios and on the other side we have depersonalization, derealization & dissociation disorders. This can also look different for other people When you struggle with dissociation it is important to bring yourself back to present moment. This isn’t always easy but things such as ice, cold water, dancing, shaking, giving yourself a hug, gently pinching / touching your arms & legs can help. Essentially, you want to try to engage your senses. It is also helpful to remind yourself that dissociation has been a tool that has kept you safe & what your body and mind deemed best in the moment. Judging yourself for this will not make it easier. Safety affirmations can help as well “I am safe” “Everything in this present moment is okay” ❤️ Ib @joshpsychology .
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How did this one make you feel 🤔 Bilateral music stimulation like you’re hearing here involves listening to music that alternates between the left and right ears. This technique is believed to be helpful for people with stress, anxiety or ADHD as it helps us reprocess certain experiences as well as promote relaxation and focus. Bilateral music stimulation may help reduce anxiety and enhance emotional regulation by activating the brain’s calming systems. The alternating music can create a sense of safety and grounding, while helping us reprocess traumatic memories. For people with ADHD, this technique can help improve attention and executive function. Some studies suggest this happens by engaging both sides of our brain which helps us increase focus. Please note that while there is research to promote the benefits of this, it is not a standalone treatment and varied based on each person ❤️ let me know what you think of this! Artist: @8D MUSIC ! . . . . . #MentalHealth #anxiety #trauma #unhealedtrauma #depression #stress #ptsd #complextrauma #cptsd #motivation #procrastination #wellness #therapy #therapist #mentalhealthmatters #socialanxiety #bpd #bipolar #dsm #adhd
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Do you have an anxious attachment style or are you in a relationship or friendship with someone who has an anxious attachment style? Someone with an anxious attachment style often thinks their partner (or friend) is always mad at them due to their deep fears of abandonment and rejection. This attachment style can cause a constant need for reassurance and closeness with the people you love. There’s a misconception in the self-help community that we need to focus on self-care and learn to love ourselves and fight against reassurance as a way to get through it. But I don’t believe that’s true, I think we learn to do these things in relationships that provide reassurance and validation. In the situation outlined above, it would be helpful for the second person to say something like “I know you may feel like something is wrong, but I’m not mad at you. I love you and everything between us is okay.” It’s a simple affirmation that can go a long way. Here are some other ways you can help: Open Communication: Encourage open and honest conversations about feelings and concerns. Create a safe space for your partner to express their insecurities without judgment. Do not roll your eyes, or get frustrated when they bring up the same topics. They need to hear it. Asking your partners needs: When they are feeling insecure or anxious, what do they need from you to help them? Is it a simple text or call, is it quality time? Figure out what works. Reassurance: Provide reassurance and verbal affirmation of your love and commitment. Remind them frequently that you care deeply about them and the relationship. Consistency: Be consistent in your actions and words. People with anxious attachments often get worried when they notice something changed or their partner isn’t showing up the way they usually do. If you have something going on in your own life, explain this to them to keep them from feeling abandoned. If you don’t, try to remain consistent for them to ease their fear. Inspired by: @nnelsson_
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